Tuesday, September 07, 2010

A THING OF BEAUTY



A twitter message from the wonderful Women's Library in London last week reminded me of the time I held, in their reading room, a volume which may have been Mary Wollstonecraft's own copy of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman.  I also spent some happy hours in that room reading Simone de Beauvoir's Letters to Nelson Algren.

There is something miraculous about holding any book - an experience which I hope future generations will not entirely abandon for the ebook - but when the book is a fine, hardback volume that pleasure is doubled.

Last week this tome, La Nascita di Roma [The Birth of Rome] was available at just €2.90 plus the price of one of a range of newspapers and magazines.  It is such a joy to hold and to look at and I am so looking forward to reading it when I have time.


I shall not be able to afford the other volumes in this series, which will be offered at a still reasonable but more realistic price. All the more reason to make the most of this one!



5 comments:

Claude said...

That book looks so precious. I understand you well. I have the same love, and the same need to hold, in my hands, a beautiful book, with a luxurious hardcover, quality paper and special illustrations. Just to look at it, and touch it, already gives a preview of the joy to read it. Although I'm happy with a paperback when it's all I can afford, I have a few Collector's Edition books which I treasure.

Let me say here that I enjoy very much the cover of "Il Profumo Del Pensiero" by Antonio Lonardo. The silky touch, the colours, the illustration are a tasteful prelude of the magnificent poems you translated so well. Thank you!

CherryPie said...

It looks like a joy to handle and read :-)mo

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Hi, Claude. I agree. All books are special. I'll pass your comment about "Il Profumo" on to Antonio, who will be delighted.
It is, Cherie.

Liz said...

I don't believe books will ever be replaced. I suspect it will be like the cinema: they said cinemas would die out because we had television but they've even more popular now.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

I do hope you're right, Liz. I like your cinema analogy.

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