Tuesday, January 29, 2008

LITTLE THINGS MEAN A LOT - 2
















By far the most interesting item displayed in my printers' trays, for Italian and British friends alike, though, is the Jeu des 7 Familles, also given to me when I was about 5 and from which I have selected a few of the less offensive images above, though they are so stereotyped and grotesque that I hesitate to show even these. Such an item would never be sold in a western European country today.




Now, I scoff as angrily as the next blogger over the madder excesses of political correctness and an example of this is here. [Thanks, James.] But I also believe that we should be reasonably careful of our terminology and if altering it slightly can spare others pain, then why not do so? For instance, a directive was issued in some British secondary schools a few years ago stating that we should no longer play that old standby, hangman, as it could bring back terrible memories to pupils who had recently arrived from countries in which there was no respect for life. It is easy enough to draw a "stop" sign on the board instead, so why not comply, if you can save a child's tears for one day? So I keep my politically incorrect jeu as a reminder of why political correctness was necessary in the first place, reader.



Beaman wrote yesterday about Holocaust Memorial Day [which is observed and respected all over Italy] and I cannot help but wonder how many lives might have been saved if more people everywhere had spoken out against the grotesque images that were used as propoganda at the beginning of that terrible era. My wish for the world in this, as in every other year, is that we do not make the same mistake again.

7 comments:

Whispering Walls said...

Winchester Cathedral had a holocaust remembrance service on Sunday and on Wednesday they're holding an evensong in memorial of Charles I who was executed on that day. I think the church does well to remind people of these events.

James Higham said...

There were many reasons and they all played on the worst aspects of human nature - resentment, envy, false pride, greed. Hitler appealed to these and a twisted sense of grotesque nationalism at a very unstable time.

The Germans rightly accept the blame for their grandparents - do the Italians?

Ellee Seymour said...

I wonder why we don't have a Holocaust memorial day in the UK too. I think James knows how the Russians lost millions in the last war too, how is it remembered there?

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Hi, WW. I agree wih you. James, I was only suggesting that this was one of the reasons. I was thinking particularly of some of the grotesque images used in France at the time. I think the Italianslargely do, yes, though Mussolini and his descendants still have admirers. Ellee, isn't it the same day all over western Europe or the EU? Interesting question for James.

Anonymous said...

How odd, I'm sure I posted here yesterday...to say what a good couple of thoughtful posts these have been. The combination of words and photos, as always, does oyu justice as well as opening up the topic for others.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Hi, Shirl. I received your comment on the pasta sauce post yesterday but not one regarding these 2 posts. Thank you so much - I really appreciate what you have said as I wasn't sure about these posts at all. xx

James Higham said...

Ellee - Beaman posted on this.

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