Friday, May 20, 2011

SICILIAN TO BE TAUGHT IN SCHOOLS



Sicilian students returning to school in September will have a new subject on their timetables - Sicilian.  Under a law passed unanimously by the Regional Assembly today, schools will be able to teach the literature, history and dialect of the island as a separate subject from Italian language and literature, in an attempt to offer students a wider education and to make them more aware of their cultural heritage.

"We are proud of our culture and traditions, so I am happy about this law which will preserve our great historic and literary heritage and make learning about it an integral part of the education of new generations", said Regional Governor Raffaele Lombardo.

It is also hoped that the measure will offer new work opportunities to teachers who are on temporary contracts in the region.  

13 comments:

rosaria said...

Interesting and touching too. Is there a chance Sicilian would die out if not taught in schools? Do the other regions cling to their dialects?

Trubes said...

That is so good for the Sicilian students Welshcakes, it is most important to preserve one's heritage, particularly local dialects and languages, can you understand/ speak Sicilian? I'm sure you can!
You seem to have really integrated yourself into Sicilian life and have such lovely kind friends, they seem to have taken you to their hearts.
I know when we go to the South of France, I try really hard to speak French, all the time, even to DT and it's amazing how accomodating the French are when you try.

Di.xx

Winchester whisperer said...

Is there a good mrket for Sicilian-Welsh translation?

Weekend Yachtsman said...

I am unsure about this.

There are movements here in Scotland to perpetuate the Gaelic language by similar policies.

It leads to the absurdity of money being spent on bilingual signage in places where nobody speaks Gaelic and what is more nobody ever did.

As for the extra teaching jobs it might create, well broken windows to you! Where will that money come from?

Claude said...

It's wonderful that Sicilian will will taught in the Sicily schools. I'm surprised it wasn't done already. The children will gain a new respect for their country's cultural traditions.

J'admire aussi beaucoup les personnes, comme vous, qui étudient un autre langage par choix. C'est très enrichissant et, surtout, cela aide les gens à mieux se comprendre et à bien accepter nos différentes façons de vivre.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Hi, Rosaria. Yes, I think that could happen, sadly. Hi, Trubes. I can understand some Sicilian but I don't speak it. Italian is the official language and is spoken by everyone here whereas of course the dialercts vary from town to town. I am , as you know, an Italian graduate and I wouldn't go anywhere without learning the local language - it's a point of honour for me! Hi, WW. Not that I know of! Hi, WY. Opinion is divided about it here, too. Some people say it is just a political convenience. As a linguist, I do think it's sad when langauages die because part of the relevant culture dies with them. I can't see the move leading to permanent contracts for those teachers! Hi, Claude. I think it's a good move on the whole, too. Je vous remercie de vos paroles gentilles. Je suis d'accord avec vous.

RNSANE said...

I think it is a good thing to preserve the language of Sicily and, of course, to promote its culture, customs, and heritage. All too often, we see native languagues and traditions die and they certainly should not!

CherryPie said...

I think that is a fine idea, it is nice to keep the cultural heritage :-)

Josep said...

These are excellent news. In Catalonia we are always struggling for preserving our heritage and it's not easy.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Hi, Josep. I do understand. The Welsh have had to make an enormous effort to preserve their language and culture.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Hi, Rosaria. Sorry I forgot to answer your question before. The Lombard dialect is being taught in schools and Sardo is the official language of Sardinia along with standard Italian.

Patricia said...

I think this is wonderful! The Sicilians value their dialect and consider it a separate language. There is an organization in the United States called Arba Sicula...based in the state of New York...whose main mission is to keep the Sicilian Language alive. They publish dual language books, translating many literary works in both Sicilian and English.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Hi, Patricia. I'm very interested to learnj about Arba Sicula and will look them up.

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