Sunday, June 15, 2008

CIVIS SUM

My boss arrived at 4pm to drive me to the polling station [she is a local candidate and is leaving nothing to chance!] I was whisked off, proudly clutching my gloriously stamped voting paper.

Did I expect things to be that simple? Well, no, not really, reader, so I was not totally surprised when the 4 members of staff manning the room looked perplexed and concluded that they could not allow me to vote because the paper did not have the "electoral code" imprinted upon it.

So off we dashed to the electoral office in Modica Bassa yet again, where the officers declared that of course the paper was valid and what was the matter with them in the polling station? They then printed yet another document, highlighting upon it all references to EU law which state that I have the right to vote. They also wrote their phone number upon this.

Back at the polling station, the poor staff still did not know what to do [probably they had never seen such an authorisation before] and so decided to call the Presidente [presiding officer] who arrived a few moments later carrying several impressive-looking tomes on electoral law. He sat himself down at a corner table, perused the new document and all the relevant sections in his scholarly books and we could see that this was likely to take some time. "Can't you call the office?" pleaded my boss. "This is my job", replied the gentleman. Pazienza!

After twenty endless minutes, suddenly he grinned at me and called over to the other staff, "Fa votare la signore" ["Let the lady vote"] and finally I exercised my democratic rights in my new country.

As we left, the two policemen on duty at the door, who had been watching our comings and goings with interest, asked us if everything was OK. We explained what had happened and then a smile of recognition crossed the face of one of them, who exclaimed, "But I know you! I came to your school last week to inform you that you had to take your electoral posters down." He seemed very proud of this achievement and neither of us felt inclined to spoil his day.

11 comments:

Lord James Bigglesworth said...

Crims are always recognized, I suppose. :)

Crushed said...

Can you vote in Italy then?

CherryPie said...

How complicated, it sounds like they are trying to put people off voting ;-)

jmb said...

The Italians in all their bureaucratic glory! Congratulations Welshcakes on your first vote in the country. No wonder people don't bother, it's such a hassle.

leslie said...

Sounds like a very complicated procedure, but then it may seem that way to new immigrants to Canada as well.

That ice cream bar below looks very tempting! ;D

Winchester whisperer said...

You'll be marked down as a revolutionary

Nunyaa said...

Agreeing with Cherie, sounds awfully complicated, at the end of the day at least you achieved and posted your vote, it might be the one that makes the difference :-)

Sally said...

Forza Welshcakes - don't forget to let us know the results!

jams o donnell said...

That was quite a rigmarole. Glad you got to mark your cross in the appropriate box in end...

Girl on the Run... said...

Bravo! Now lets hope whomever you voted for does a great job! ~M

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Quite so, James. Hi, Crushed. Yes, in local, but not national, elections. Hi, cherrypie. You would think so but I don't think it's that - just few pwople like me in an area such as this. Thanks, jmb. I'm quite pleased about it, actually. Ciao, Leslie. Very complicated indeed. Come over and have some of the ice cream cake! You may have a point there, WW. Ciao, nunyaa. I do think it's important to vote if you can . As you say, one vote coud make a difference. Thanks, Sally, and I will. Hi, jams. A bit of a rigmarloe, it is true, but glad I did it. Ciao and thanks, M.

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