Friday, August 13, 2010

THE DANGERS OF USING TRENDY ENGLISH

Oh, pity the Mayor of Ragusa who is inadvertently going to cause much confusion among English-speaking visitors this summer:  The Mayor, in his wisdom, has declared a "dog free zone" along a 200-metre stretch of the spiaggia degli Americani down at the Marina di Ragusa, but he doesn't mean an area free of dogs;  he means the opposite - an area where dogs, provided they are on a leash and muzzled, will be tolerated on the beach.

English has the advantage of being a more economical languager than Italian, so I can understand why the phrase seemed attractive but please, Mr Mayor, check out the meaning!

Simi thinks the dogs will not have much fun if they have to be muzzled all the time and she'd rather stay at home!

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8 comments:

lakeviewer said...

Oh yes. Good point. I'm impressed at how many businesses use English in all of Europe.
Saluti da Oregon, where dogs are welcomed everywhere.

CherryPie said...

That is one cool Doggie Dude floating on the water :-)

Sean Jeating said...

Ha ha ha ...
That reminds me of a sign behind a 1,5 metres high fence of some carabinieri telling in English 'No trespassing', in German, though: 'Unübersteigbare Grenze' [unsurmountable border(line)].

jams o donnell said...

Oops! Ah well I hope the confusion is sorted. Still I doubt I would like to be muzzled either if I was in Simi's paws!

James Higham said...

Cooler at home.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Saluti e buon ferragosto, lakeviewer. Simi chose the pic, Cherie! Haha, Sean! Hi, jams. Simi says thanks for the empathy. Quite so, James.

Dragonstar said...

English can be a confusing language. I remember a small child telling me that something was "tasty" when she meant it tasted strange!
Love the cool dog - much nicer than baking on the beach.

Welshcakes Limoncello said...

Hi, Dragonstar. That's funny. Simi chose the pic!

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